Considered by Cadw to be the best Edwardian gardens in Wales, the National Trust’s Dyffryn Gardens comprises of intimate garden rooms, formal lawns and a glasshouse showcasing an impressive cacti and orchid collection.

Follow:

Dyffryn is a peaceful oasis on the outskirts of Cardiff, boasting 55 acres of exceptional Edwardian garden design around its unique Victorian mansion house.

Considered by Cadw to be the best Edwardian gardens in Wales, the National Trust’s Dyffryn Gardens comprises of intimate garden rooms, formal lawns and a glasshouse showcasing an impressive cacti and orchid collection.

Standing at the heart of the estate is the magnificent Dyffryn House, where everyone can play the pianos, enjoy a game of billiards or sit down and admire the breath-taking views.

The property has been a popular filming location for Casualty and Dr Who, and was featured in the BBC’s 2017 production of ‘Decline and Fall’ starring Eva Longoria and Jack Whitehall.

Dyffryn’s arboretum on the east side of the garden is a wild and exotic area, holding one of the most significant collections of trees in the National Trust. Covering 22 acres, there is plenty to discover, with all year round colour and 17 Champion Trees, the largest of their kind in the British Isles.

Open all year round

Open from 10am every day except for Christmas and Boxing Day, there is ample opportunity to explore the evolving gardens, taste the produce in the café and shop at reception.

Dyffryn’s regular programme of events and activities also means that there are plenty of things to see and do. From half term family fun, traditional Christmas celebrations and stargazing evenings, there is something for everyone.

History of Dyffryn

Looking beyond the botanical displays, you’ll see evidence of the garden design of eminent landscape architect, Thomas Mawson, who was commissioned in 1903 by John Cory, a coal entrepreneur and important figure in South Wales during the Victorian era. The originality of the garden’s arrangement was due to Mawson’s collaboration with Reginald Cory, John’s son who was a passionate plantsman and funded several plant hunting trips across the world.

Throughout the 20th century, Dyffryn became a training centre for police, was used as a conference centre and was also suggested to become a five-star hotel. However, over time, the site suffered periods of neglect. In the late 1990s, the Vale of Glamorgan began a programme of revival, with help from two grants for the gardens and a grant for the house in 2010.

In 2013, the National Trust took on a 50-year lease, and with the help of visitors and a hardworking team of staff and volunteers, they are continuing to revive and develop the property, welcoming more than 100,000 visitors each year.

Facilities and Access

  • Admission prices and opening times for gardens and house available via the website
  • Dogs on leads are welcome in all areas of the gardens
  • Children’s play area located near reception
  • Wild, natural play area coming in winter 2017
  • Accessible toilets and baby-changing facilities
  • Free car parking
  • Dyffryn House and the majority of the gardens are wheelchair friendly
  • Volunteer run visitor buggy service to help with getting around the garden

Courtesy wheelchairs and mobility scooters available to hire in advance

DYFFRYN GARDENS LEAFLET

 

Email

dyffryn@nationaltrust.org.uk

Website

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/dyffryn-gardens

Telephone

02920 593328

Address

Dyffryn Gardens, National Trust
St Nicholas,
Vale of Glamorgan,
CF5 6SU

Directions

By road: From M4 take junction 33 on to A4232 (to Barry). Exit second slip road, at roundabout take the fourth exit A48 (to Cowbridge). In St Nicholas village follow signs for Dyffryn. NOTE – using a SatNav may take you to a nearby farm

By bus: X2 bus service to St Nicholas, then approximately 1 mile (1.6km) walk along road without pavement

By train: Cardiff Central. Approximately 7 miles (11.3km)

Upcoming Events

Dyffryn Gardens,
Vale of Glamorgan, CF5 6SU United Kingdom
View all Events at this Venue